Kindle Bargain £0.99: My Dear I Wanted To Tell You by Louisa Young

I love love this book so much. Every page was gripping and it is not your normal love story. It a war themed love story filled with angst, sadness , hurt and pain! A very beautifully read war love story. And don’t expect for any steam in here! Loved it!

Need a change, pick it up!

http://www.amazon.co.uk/Dear-Wanted-Tell-You-ebook/dp/B004Q3RMPI/ref=sr_1_1?s=digital-text&ie=UTF8&qid=1381831998&sr=1-1&keywords=my+dear+i+wanted+to+tell+you

Blurb:

The lives of two very different couples are irrevocably intertwined and forever changed in this stunning World War I epic of love and war.

From the day in 1907 that eleven-year-old Riley Purefoy meets Nadine Waveney, daughter of a well-known orchestral conductor, he takes in the difference between their two families: his, working-class; hers, “posh” and artistic. Just a few years later, romance and these differences erupt simultaneously with the war in Europe. In a fit of fury and boyish pride, Riley enlists in the army and finds himself involved in the transformative nightmare of the twentieth century.

While Riley and his commanding officer, Peter Locke, fight for their country and their survival in the trenches of Flanders, Peter’s lovely and naive wife, Julia, and his cousin Rose eagerly await his return. But the sullen, distant man who arrives home on leave is not the Peter they knew. Worried that her husband is slipping away, Julia is left alone with her fears when Rose joins the nursing corps to work with a pioneering plastic surgeon treating wounded and disfigured soldiers.

Only eighteen at the outbreak of the war, Nadine and Riley want to make promises to each other—but how can they when their future is out of their hands? Youthful passion is on their side, but then their loyalty is tested by terrible injury, and even more so by the necessarily imperfect rehabilitation that follows.

Moving among Ypres, London, and Paris, this emotionally rich and evocative novel is both a powerful exploration of the lasting effects of war on those who fight—and those who don’t—and a poignant testament to the power of enduring love.

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